Work Smarter When You Learn to Say No at the Office

Work Smarter When You Learn to Say No at the Office

I hate saying no at the office. I’ve accepted assignments that no one wants, last minute requests and the coordination of a labor-intensive fundraiser during my busiest time of the year. In my mind, this makes me a team player and a valuable asset. However, a reluctance to say no may actually make me a martyr at the expense of my health and career.

 Why You Should Learn to Say No at the Office

Saying no doesn’t come naturally to many people. Whatever the reason − guilt, the need to please, the fear of disappointing others – we struggle with saying no at the office. But it’s okay because there’s no harm in saying yes, right? Maybe not.

Here are five reasons why it’s beneficial for you to learn to say no at the office:

  1. Control your stress: You can’t do it all. Accepting more than a reasonable share of responsibilities at work leads to stress in trying to complete them and balance your commitments at home. With that stress comes associated health problems, including high blood pressure, anxiety, and even a higher risk for diabetes.
  2. Maintain your reputation: You have a reputation as a great performer who always delivers on your assignments. Saying yes to everything at work reduces the time, attention, and energy you can dedicate to each project. You may find yourself rushing through projects, making mistakes, or even missing deadlines.
  3. Be more productive: A particular assignment may require a special set of skills that you don’t have. Rather than struggling with a task you have no experience in, the assignment would be better handled by someone with those skills. Then you can spend your time more productively.
  4. Say no to say yes: There is a finite number of hours in a day. When you say yes to one thing, you may be inadvertently saying no to something else. For example, taking on a project for a friend may mean that you have less time available for your clients.
  5. Value yourself: Remember your personal time and mental health are important too. While there may be times you have to stay late or answer emails after work hours, remember you also need time to rest and reenergize.

 When You Should Learn to Say No at the Office

It’s understandable you want to always say yes to your employer and/or clients; however, there are some times when you need to say no. Here are three situations where you should reconsider before saying yes at the office:

  1. When something can’t be done or is out of your control: Grow sales by 200%. Complete a five-week project in one week. Don’t say yes and try to achieve the impossible. It would be better for you to set realistic expectations with your manager and/or client and then work to achieve or surpass them.
  2. When you already have a full workload: You’re already working from 9 to 6 with barely any time for breaks and still log on at home to finish projects. The new assignment may be easy but it’s still going to require time that you just don’t have.
  3. When it goes against your values: In a study, more than half of the subjects complied with a request even though it went against their ethics. Going along with something that is against your values can lead to discomfort and self-resentment.

 How to Say No at the Office

It’s just a two letter word, but it can be one of the hardest words to say. Here are five tips to help you learn to say no effectively:

  1. Say no: Don’t beat around the bush. Don’t leave it up for interpretation.
  2. Be polite: Try saying “I would like to help, but I can’t.”
  3. Be firm: If the person is persistent even after you say no, don’t be afraid to say no again.
  4. Recommend an alternative: If you can’t help, suggest another colleague who may be able to step in. Maybe you can recommend a better, simpler approach to handling the assignment
  5. Push back: If a manager asks you to take on a new assignment when you don’t have time, ask them for help prioritizing the request with your current work load.

The word “no” is powerful at the office. Just remember it’s okay to use it.

Anna Li

Written by Anna Li

Anna is an internal communications specialist. Working with key internal stakeholders, she develops and executes the internal communications plan for Trion. She also manages the Trion intranet to help foster greater collaboration and engagement between employees.

Trion Communications Anna.Li@trion-mma.com

3 Ways to Fight Opioids’ Effects on the Workforce

3 Ways to Fight Opioids’ Effects on the Workforce

America’s growing opioid addiction crisis affects all areas of life, including the workplace. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates the economic impact of opioid addiction is more than $78.5 billion a year. This estimate includes costs of healthcare; lost productivity; addiction treatment; and the involvement of the criminal justice system.

While the monetary cost is immense, the toll on human lives is more concerning. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) estimates that every day an average of 90 Americans die after overdosing on opioids. Drug overdose has become the leading cause of death for Americans under 50, a group that forms the core of the workforce.

Addressing the opioid epidemic is a sensitive topic for many employers. They may fear legal ramifications from mishandling an employee suffering from addiction. However, silence or reactive company policies will not yield the changes needed to reverse current trends.

Here are three suggestions to safely and proactively address the opioid crisis with your employees.

1. Educate Employees on the Risks

Misinformation is a major reason the opioid epidemic remains a persistent problem. Many employees continue to associate opioid addiction with illegal narcotics, such as heroin. In 2015, an estimated 591,000 people in the United States suffered from a heroin-use disorder. By comparison, over 2 million people suffered from prescription opioid-related addiction. Communication pieces that effectively educate employees on the dangers of prescription opioids are essential.

2. Empower Employees in Prevention Efforts

Encourage employees to have open conversations with their primary care physician. Employees have a right to question their healthcare provider if he or she prescribes an opioid. They should learn about alternative ways to treat and manage pain. Your company’s prescription drug carrier can provide resources about covered alternate pain medications.

3. Provide a Path to Recovery

For many employees who struggle with addiction, the biggest barrier to recovery is not knowing how to take the first step. Your company can provide this essential resource in the form of an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The National Safety Council notes that 70 percent of all U.S. companies provide EAPs. Yet “many employees don’t understand the value or may fear negative ramifications if they seek help.” An EAP connects employees with the best resources for addiction recovery that are aligned with your benefits program.

Your messages can minimize the stigma of addiction and encourage employees to prevent opioid misuse. Then your company will provide a vital contribution to the ongoing struggle against opioid abuse.

 

Andrew Clancy

Written by Andrew Clancy

Andrew is an experienced communications professional who specializes in multimedia content creation. He enjoys the process of building communications solutions that achieve an organization’s objectives while empowering its employees through education.

Trion Communications Andrew.Clancy@trion-mma.com

3 Resolutions to Make You Better at Your Career

3 Resolutions to Make You Better at Your Career

Welcome to 2018! A new page in the calendar means time to set new intentions. 45% of Americans make a new year’s resolution. The most popular are losing weight, exercising, and quitting smoking.

While those are worthy ambitions, have you thought about making a career resolution instead? This year, devote time and energy to improving your performance at the office. Here are 3 ideas for how to make 2018 your best career year yet.

1. Learn a new skill

Ask yourself: What are the gaps in my skill set? What do I need to know to be more productive in my job?

Once you have your answers, investigate the best way to learn. Consider your time and your budget. Find out if your company offers reimbursement for professional development activities. If not, instead negotiate for the time to learn via low cost or free methods.

Fortunately, there are many platforms to help you meet this career resolution. Industry conferences are the costliest and most time-consuming. However, you can fully immerse yourself and pick up multiple skills from experts in your field. Your local community college is another resource for in-person professional development courses.

If virtual is more your speed, Coursera and EdX offer online classes at a variety of price points, including free. There are also countless YouTube tutorials and TED talks available to stream. If your gaps are “soft skills,” like time management, you might benefit from one of those videos.

Taking initiative to acquire a new skill shows your boss you are serious about improving your performance in 2018. Lifelong learning is a mark of intelligence and commitment.

2. Find or be a mentor

A mentor is a powerful ally as you climb the career ladder. Their feedback can help you make important decisions.

If you are a new graduate, a former professor may transition into the role of mentor, especially if your career lines up with your major. If you are further along in your career, search your professional network. On LinkedIn, look for a second degree connection whose career path you admire. Ask common acquaintances for an introduction.

Live networking events are another opportunity to meet a potential mentor. Your chamber of commerce is a good resource to find such opportunities.

Becoming a mentor and sharing your wisdom is another take on this career resolution. The best mentoring relationships are give and take. You and your mentee should both learn from each other. Providing career guidance to another can grow your self-confidence in your job.

If you want to share what you’ve learned, it’s easy to find a mentee. Many college alumni associations offer mentor match programs, pairing you with a student or young alumni. Your company might also have formal mentoring opportunities.

Technology means you don’t need to be in the same city or country as your mentor or mentee. Skype sessions, FaceTime, and Google video hangouts are free ways to have a conversation across time zones.

3. Vow to unplug

A digital detox can benefit both your mental health and your job performance. Being connected 24-7 gives the flexibility to work anytime and anyplace, which is a blessing and a curse.

Our brains can only handle so much information at once. Have you ever missed important details in a meeting because you were focused on checking your inbox? Interpersonal communication depends heavily on body language. What subtle clues are you giving coworkers in a meeting or friends over dinner if one eye is always on your phone?

There are several ways to temporarily unplug so you can meet this career resolution and improve your productivity. Install internet blocking software to minimize distractions when trying to hit deadlines. Charge your phone outside of your bedroom each night. Try not checking your work email on a Sunday. Use the time you save to engage in good-for-you, analog pursuits like cooking, exercising, and reading.

A mental reset means we face Monday morning better able to handle the challenges of a new work week.

Taking on a career resolution in 2018 can open new doors of professional success. By improving your relationships and your skill sets you increase your value at work. That sets you on the road to making a true impact in your job.

 

 

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Danielle Love

Written by Danielle Love

Danielle is a benefits communications specialist, working on behalf of clients to write, edit and design dynamic print and virtual communications. She also manages the Trion Communications blog, which highlights the practice’s diverse areas of expertise.

Trion Communications Danielle.Love@trion-mma.com

Consider Employee Wellness in the New Year

Consider Employee Wellness in the New Year

Happy New Year! It’s time to prepare for a new journey for our well-being, both physically and mentally.

Well-being is encouraging myself and others to be remarkable, mindful, and live with a purpose. So, I’ll jump on my soap box and shout to the world: “Hey! Does your company support a wellness program for its employees?”

Well, if they don’t, I challenge you to stand on your soap box and get involved this year. Take ownership of your and your co-workers’ well-being. Create an employee wellness movement that drives change.

Drive Change

It’s time corporations listen and take interest not only in employees’ medical expenses, but in their whole person—productivity, engagement, loyalty, and job satisfaction.

Create a friendly, comfortable, open environment for your employees to develop a wellness movement. Your goal should be fostering a culture that is engaged, focused, and enthusiastic about living with a purpose.

Health care costs are going up every year. By incorporating robust wellness programs into your benefits plan, you encourage employees to take control of preventable diseases. Did you know that according to Health Affairs Magazine, workplace wellness programs support the prevention of cardiovascular disease?

It’s simple to create an employee wellness movement within your company. Remember listen . . . create . . . inspire . . . reward.

Listen

Develop a comprehensive survey to evaluate your employees’ understanding of how wellness affects every moment of their lives, at home and at work. Pose questions which are personal and caring. Ask how they would like to improve their health and professional development. Engage management to create a safe environment for your colleagues to get involved.

Create

Your employees are hungry for health and wellness information. According to the Pew Trust Research Center, 35% of adults have gone online to find information on a medical condition.

Create employee wellness communications to educate, engage, and motivate. All communications should be targeted and multi-channeled with their frequency and placement.

Programs can start small, then grow into movements that drive behavioral change, enrich lives, and create productive, satisfied employees. Here is a case study on an insurance company that started a small wellness program and embraced the benefits of creating a culture of wellness.

Inspire

Your employees work hard. Promote wellness by designing a work environment that drives behavioral change. A targeted, robust employee wellness program will inspire co-workers at every level. You will begin to hear chatter of wellness achievements and increases in behavioral change. These are the start of the benefits of a wellness movement.

Reward

Reward your colleagues for reaching their goals with caring and meaningful incentives. You will begin to see a community that recognizes success and celebrates each other. Your colleagues will come to work more productive, enthusiastic, engaged, and healthier. These are the benefits of educating and inspiring your colleagues into a culture of well-being. You did it! It’s an employee wellness movement.

The bottom line is, don’t just focus on the financial part of your benefits. Focus on the whole person. At Trion Communications, we have the tools to help create an employee wellness movement within your company. For more information please call or click to speak to one of our communication experts. We will help you get on your soap box and create a culture of well-being.

Remember to be remarkable, be well, be mindful, and live with a purpose.

 

Sharon Tucker

Written by Sharon Tucker

Sharon is an experienced marketing and communications professional who specializes in multi-channel marketing strategies. She enjoys the process of strategizing and implementing communication solutions that maximize the opportunity to educate, motivate and empower employees to make the right benefits decision for their family’s needs.

Trion Communications sharon.tucker@trion-mma.com