Bring Your Employee Communications to Life With Video

Bring Your Employee Communications to Life With Video

Employee communications videos are an increasingly viable and popular way to connect and engage with your staff. While you still may choose other methods for your internal communications (multiple channels are important to make sure your message is heard), adding video to your toolkit is a beneficial way to bring your communications to life. Video grabs employees’ attention faster than email, long presentations, large documents, or lengthy team meetings.

One major reason for the popularity of videos is that they are fast, interactive and entertaining ways to digest information. Data shared by YouTube shows that people watch one billion hours of video on the platform every day. Another benefit of video is analytics. Statistics give you the ability to see how many people viewed your employee communications videos, assess your video strategy, and adjust that strategy if needed.

Employee Communications Videos Connect With Younger Employees

Employee communications videos help you stay relevant in the changing workplace. Gen Z, people born after 1994, has started to graduate college and find jobs. This wave of new employees shows preference for video. A study by Awesomeness shows this generation watches an average of 68 videos each day.

It’s vital to make sure employee communications videos are mobile friendly, since Gen Z can’t remember a time before cell phones. Their preferred way to consume videos is on their phones. Make sure all your employees hear, understand and remember important internal messages by adding video your communications mix.

Short and Sweet Employee Communications Videos Win Attention

Being mindful of your video’s length is a proven way to ensure your message reaches the most viewers possible—and keep their attention. Wistia, a video hosting platform, looked at 564,710 videos and more than 1.3 billion plays to determine the relationship between video length and viewer engagement. What they discovered is viewer engagement is steady up to 2 minutes.

After that two minute mark, there is a significant drop off in viewers. This suggests short and sweet is the best policy. If your employee communications video needs to be longer, put the most important information within the first two minutes.

Adding video to your toolkit is another useful way to bring your employee communications to life. It’s a necessary tool for communications teams who want to ensure all employees receive and pay attention to important messages.

Mike Turko

Written by Mike Turko

Mike is a senior graphic designer at Trion. He specializes in communicating ideas through both print and digital design mediums. Mike also works to develop custom, interactive digital marketing campaigns that effectively engage a variety of employee audiences.

Trion Communications mike.turko@trion-mma.com

Four Reasons Good Design Will Help Your Bottom Line

Four Reasons Good Design Will Help Your Bottom Line

As a graphic designer, I know that good design is good business. I know that without good design, communications do not educate and engage employees effectively. High-performing organizations make employee communications a priority. They know that an engaged workforce contributes to the company’s success.

The organizations that engage their employees the most know that good design helps that goal. It’s the constant the blends message, images, illustration, typography and motion graphics into an appealing whole.

Here are four reasons good design is good business.

1. Good Design Pays Off

The DMI Design Value Index applies six good design management criteria to publicly-traded U.S. companies on the S&P 500 Index. The criteria reward companies that invest in good design practices as a business strategy. Some tactics include:

  • Designers have a presence on the leadership team
  • The company grows its investment in design
  • Design is integrated into company procedures and policies

Of those companies, 16 met the standards of good design. These members of the Design Value Index outperformed the rest of the S&P by 211%.

“We see design not as a pure factor that makes our DVI company’s stocks perform better on the stock market, but rather as a highly integrated and influential force that enables the organization to achieve outsized results,” wrote Jeneanne Rao, CEO of Motiv Strategies, who partners with DMI to create the list.

2. Good Design Saves Time

When it comes time to decide on format—for example, a JPG, TIF, EPS, PDF or GIF —a good graphic designer knows which print or digital format gets results. If it’s alphabet soup to you, it may be time to engage a designer. The same goes for RGB versus CMYK color modes, paper weights, and uses and types of website content management systems. Are your communications scaled properly and do they have enough color contrast to be easily read when published?

Graphic design professionals have the training, mastery of industry software and years of experience to make the correct choices. You won’t have to waste time and aggravation to try to figure out what makes for good design.

3. Good Design Saves Money

It pays to invest in good graphic design. Cheap design often means poor design. Yet, poorly designed graphics can be more expensive in the long term. Without the expertise of a professional graphic designer, you may end up with a product that is not formatted for print or online publishing. It could be expensive to print due to color management or layout problems.

Changes, delays and redesigns cost money. A cheap, crowdsourced logo may end up costing more than one from a higher-priced, experienced graphic designer. It’s just further evidence that that good design is good business.

4. Good Design Keeps Employee’s Interest and Attention

Whether it’s webpages, emails or printed materials, communications with high-quality visuals grab attention at a higher rate than those with poor design and no images. Online shoppers cite image quality as one of the most important criteria in their purchasing decisions. In one study, 46% of people ranked a web site’s design as the number one way they rate a brand’s credibility.

Good graphic design uses smart layouts, high-quality photography, infographics, illustrations and video to create successful, attention-getting communications.

Mike Turko

Written by Mike Turko

Mike is a senior graphic designer at Trion. He specializes in communicating ideas through both print and digital design mediums. Mike also works to develop custom, interactive digital marketing campaigns that effectively engage a variety of employee audiences.

Trion Communications mike.turko@trion-mma.com

How to Communicate Better with your Graphic Designer

How to Communicate Better with your Graphic Designer

Over the years, I have noticed the following procedures correlate with efficient design projects.

Tell us your problems, goals and expectations

A big part of the design process is figuring out how to solve your problems and meet your goals and expectations with an exciting design. Before designers begin working with colors and images we put a lot of thought into how we can communicate your information in a logical way. Design can help solve your communication problems and meet your goals and expectations. One problem could be how to communicate a complicated open enrollment benefit chart in an easy-to-understand way. Another issue is how to make sure your target audience receives important information. If we know what you need to accomplish, we can figure out the best way to get the results you want.

Give us your guidelines, stylesheets and deadlines

The more information you give us the better. If you are not sure what you want (besides visually-appealing content) even the smallest detail or note is helpful. But, remember, the less information we have the greater the chance the proof will not be what you expected, and it may require extensive revisions. The deadline is also important. Most designers I know will change things and think of new ideas and modifications until the end of time, so we need a deadline. A deadline helps us fit all creativity, design execution, and proofing into the time available to us.

Tell us what you don’t you want

Telling us what you don’t want is also helpful. It helps us narrow down what we have to work with and also makes you happy since your proof won’t contain your pet peeves. If you do not like purple, Helvetica, and cartoony art let us know upfront.

Give us examples

If you have an example of what how envision your project, show it to us. We won’t copy the examples but will use them to get an idea of what you want for the project’s overall look. Maybe you envision it clean with a lot of white space, or fun, or corporate. Since all these styles are subjective an example helps us determine your idea of “fun.”

Tell us what you like and dislike about the proof

We took all information you gave us and figured out a way to visually represent it. The proof is now in your inbox. The first draft should be close to what you were expecting relative to the amount of information you gave us. If the proof is not what you were expecting there is a positive consequence. We now have an example of what you don’t want. The best thing we can do is apply the above steps to the proof. Tell us what you don’t like about the proof, give us examples of what you do like, and give us guidelines on what to change.

Working with your graphic designer and achieving great results will be easy if you follow the above recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mike Turko

Written by Mike Turko

Mike is a senior graphic designer at Trion. He specializes in communicating ideas through both print and digital design mediums. Mike also works to develop custom, interactive digital marketing campaigns that effectively engage a variety of employee audiences.

Trion Communications mike.turko@trion-mma.com

Audio Books: An Environmental Wellness Booster Shot

Audio Books: An Environmental Wellness Booster Shot

Thanks to audio books my car has transformed into a pleasant, stimulating environment. I now prefer listening to books since one tap eliminates: lugging around another device or book, scrolling, difficult sunny-day reading, reading the same page over and over, and eye strain to name a few. The more benefits and situations I find for audio books, the more I wonder why newspapers and magazines are not offering it.

Besides eliminating boredom in unreadable situations, audio books add a new element to book selection and enjoyment … the narrator’s performance. I’ve sent books back due to an annoying narrating style. On the flip side, I’ve finished a book because I liked a narrator, and I’ve selected books based solely on a favorite narrator.

I was surprised to find out my local library is on top of this technology and how easy it is to check out books and start listening. Set up involves creating an online account with an active library card and PIN numbers (You will have to head to the library to get a PIN number and/or reactivate your card), download an app called OverDrive, select your books and download them to your device. You are able to put a hold on books, renew them, have them automatically checked out plus a variety of other robust features

For me, audiobooks are the way to go especially during my commute, at least until I have a self-driving car.

Mike Turko

Written by Mike Turko

Mike is a senior graphic designer at Trion. He specializes in communicating ideas through both print and digital design mediums. Mike also works to develop custom, interactive digital marketing campaigns that effectively engage a variety of employee audiences.

Trion Communications mike.turko@trion-mma.com

Tee Time

Tee Time

Earlier this month I decided to print a tee shirt. Not only did I end up with a cool shirt but since I engaged in a creative and stimulating mental activity, I gave my intellectual wellness a good workout.

All of the steps seem simple enough: create a design, print the design onto a transparency, make a screen, burn the design onto the screen, and squeegee the design onto a shirt.

The execution of these steps…not so simple.

The design needs to be manipulated, so it translates correctly. The transparency image must be opaque.  The mesh has to be stretched and glued banjo skin tight.  The photo emulsion needs to be evenly applied.  The screen exposure time has to be determined.  The squeegee pressure and angle should be consistent. Each of these processes relies on the other and each has a major impact on the end result.

I enjoy printing tee shirts because it is a challenging and creative endeavor, which builds on many of the skills I’ve developed throughout my graphic design career, including my current position on Trion’s Communications Practice.  On this team, I create a wide variety of media including animated videos, websites, html emails, open enrollment guides, postcards and infographics that our clients use to communicate employee benefit information to their employees.

Working with an old school process and medium is a rewarding and inspirational change of pace from my daily computer based projects.  There are plenty of things to learn and hands-on skills to master—in the graphic design world and beyond–which is good news for my intellectual wellness.

Mike Turko

Written by Mike Turko

Mike is a senior graphic designer at Trion. He specializes in communicating ideas through both print and digital design mediums. Mike also works to develop custom, interactive digital marketing campaigns that effectively engage a variety of employee audiences.

Trion Communications mike.turko@trion-mma.com