A Day in the Life of a Trion Intern

A Day in the Life of a Trion Intern

From working on social media projects and writing blogs; from sitting in on meetings and working on requests for proposals, to learning from seasoned employees, having breakfast with the CEO and going to a Phillies game, there was never a dull moment in Trion’s summer internship program. Being a Trion intern was a very rewarding experience because of the way they run their program and the way they treat each one of us.

When I first learned that I’d gotten this internship in the marketing department, I was both excited and scared. After all, this would be my first “real” experience working in Corporate America. After studying it in school, I was eager to learn if marketing was something I’d actually like in practice. I wondered if I’d get a better idea of where I wanted my career to go. I wanted to fit in with the other interns and employees.

I was also nervous. I had no idea what to expect about the company itself, the culture, the summer internship program or what was expected of me. Stepping into my first day of orientation was thrilling and intimidating. Now, looking back at the experience, I’m happy to say I’ve learned more than I could have hoped.

Understanding Expectations is Key

Having a clear understanding what was expected of me in the role helped me feel comfortable and valued. Trion’s clearly defined expectations gave me the structure I needed to do my best and reach my fullest potential. Interns were supposed to do our best work on projects, meet deadlines, show up to meetings on time, and work 40 hours each week.

I appreciated that team leaders didn’t just have me get coffee or file papers. They gave me real work. My projects were shared with clients, used by other employees at Trion and posted on the company website. Leaders also gave feedback to help me learn and show me they appreciated my dedication to a job well done.

It’s Nice to be Appreciated

Their guidance and appreciation were two of the many ways the people at Trion showed they cared about our experiences at the summer internship program. They put a lot of time into preparing for us. They set up meetings, lunch and learns, and other activities to help us get the most from our internships.

Our internship leaders consistently checked in to answer our questions and assigned us each a mentor. They let us make mistakes and gave us feedback that helped us do better the next time. They gave us deadlines so we could learn how to manage our time, and they followed up to make sure we were never unsure about what we needed to do.

There’s no Shame in Asking for Help

I will be the first person to admit one of my weaknesses is communicating especially when I am confused. No one at Trion made me feel bad about asking for help. To the contrary, my colleagues encouraged my questions and were eager to teach me. They were generous with their feedback and critiqued my work when appropriate. They encouraged me when I was tenuous and praised me for a job well done.

I can say with confidence my communication skills have grown tenfold during this summer internship program at Trion. I learned to be more confident and comfortable asking questions. I’m now more professional in how I talk, write, and interact with the professionals around me.

Soak it All In

Being new to the world of insurance and benefits, I had many questions. Every single employee I met was open and available to answer my questions. We had an opportunity to meet with employees from different parts of the organization. We learned more about what they did and how they got to Trion. We sat in on meetings and phone calls and went to training programs to learn more about the insurance industry, the roles of each employee, and how to be professional in business. These skills would serve us both professionally and personally.

While I came into this summer internship program unsure, I left with newfound confidence and knowledge. I am thankful for the time I spent at Trion and for all the wonderful people I met. I would recommend this internship program to anyone looking to leave with important skills they can use in the “real world.”

 

 

Paige McQuillen

Written by Paige McQuillen

Paige McQuillen is a summer marketing intern for Trion. She is a rising Junior at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, where she majors in Marketing. Paige enjoys using her creativity in her writing and has previous experience with blogging.

Trion Communications paige.mcquillen@trion-mma.com

What Your Younger Employees Need to Know About Life Insurance Policies

What Your Younger Employees Need to Know About Life Insurance Policies

Most of your younger employees don’t think that a life insurance policy applies to them. For the most part, they’re still healthy. For another, many haven’t yet married or had children, and see an investment in life insurance as a waste of money.

And yet, the truth is life insurance can be meaningful for everybody, no matter their age or stage of life. The challenge is to help them see how they can benefit from a life insurance policy when they’re not convinced they need it just yet.

That’s where effective communications come in. Use the right strategy and tactics to encourage younger employees to take a look at life insurance. Help them see its value and embrace that idea that it may not be as expensive or unnecessary as they think. To the contrary, buying a plan now may very well save them money down the road. Here are four tactics to get your younger employees to consider a life insurance policy.

1. Remind Them Insurance Protects Their Loved Ones In Case Of The Unexpected

While nobody ever wants an accident or injury to happen, the fact is it does at any age. That’s why your younger workers should consider a life insurance policy. It protects their family members from having to worry about paying for a costly funeral. If employees are aware of this huge expense it could sway them to buy a plan. Then they wouldn’t feel guilty about leaving those expenses up to someone else.

2. Convey That Plans Are Affordable

Let them know that you, as their employer, already offer them a basic life insurance policy. Show them the value of buying supplemental life insurance on top of it.

If your company doesn’t already offer it, think about adding supplemental life insurance to your voluntary benefits. Your employees will appreciate the convenience of one-stop shopping for benefits. Supplemental life insurance normally only costs healthy people in their twenties a couple pennies to the dollar per month. It is worth the investment to buy supplemental coverage, as it will not put a dent in their pockets.

3. Promote Now, Save Later

One of the easiest incentives for your younger employees to consider life insurance policies now is that they’re less expensive. Although they may not feel they need life insurance right now, they know they will need it later in their lives. This is a great selling point. Use side-by-side comparison charts and coverage examples in your communications to show them the value of buying when they’re young.

4. Show Them the Stakes

Most younger employees don’t consider the stakes involved in not having life insurance coverage. The risk of disease and death is lower for the young and healthy, but the unexpected can happen. And if it did, how would their loved ones fare? Employees need to understand life insurance offers them and their families’ important protection. Their families won’t go into debt paying for their care or funeral expenses.

Younger employees should consider other expenses too. If a parent co-signed on a private student loan, they would be responsible for the balance. That can be a hefty sum.

Employers should communicate to younger employees that life insurance is indeed for everyone. Help them see the wisdom of buying a life insurance policy at an earlier age. It is an important way for employers to help their people stay healthy—physically, mentally, and financially.

 

Paige McQuillen

Written by Paige McQuillen

Paige McQuillen is a summer marketing intern for Trion. She is a rising Junior at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, where she majors in Marketing. Paige enjoys using her creativity in her writing and has previous experience with blogging.

Trion Communications paige.mcquillen@trion-mma.com

The Value of Video and Audio for Employee Communications

The Value of Video and Audio for Employee Communications

There are many ways to communicate information to employees. Some are more successful than others, when you know your employees’ communications preferences and what works in your organization. If you haven’t tried it already, research tells us the value of video and audio. Content distributed through video and audio (like podcasts) is one of the most powerful ways to ensure your message sticks with your audience.

In fact, research says people process visuals 60,000 times faster than plain text. The value of video and audio for employee communications is endless; some ways include interaction, repetitiveness, and savings.

Value of Interactivity

Have you ever noticed people can become distracted while you’re giving a regular PowerPoint presentation? They check their phones, stare out the window or worse yet, nod off a bit. That’s a sign there may be better ways to get your message across. It starts with a robust mix of communications tactics, like print, presentations, and especially, audio and video. In the digital world we live in, more and more people recognize the value of audio and video to get their information.

At Trion, we use the cloud-based technology, Brainshark, to create narrated and often animated video presentations in PowerPoint. These engage our clients’ employees around benefits and allow Human Resources teams to create compelling and interesting presentations. This approach has been extremely successful because of the robust functionality and interactivity of the platform.

Interactive videos keep employees engaged and alert, which helps to effectively communicate important information.

Value of Repetition

When you communicate important information to employees, you can do more than just hope that they’ll remember and comprehend it. You can repeat it – over and over again. Research shows repetition is one of the keys of effective communications.

Stats also show people comprehend illustrated text (or text with design) 83% more effectively than text alone. Sharing content through audio and video supports not only retention, but increases the likelihood information will be shared. Digital content can be passed along easily and quickly, again proving the value of video and audio for employee communications.

Value of Savings

By sending audio and video content to our clients, we help them save time and money. They don’t have to travel to different parts of the company to hold face-to-face meetings with employees. Instead, they can send that information through the computer, using cloud-based technology that doesn’t require any back-end technology on their part. Spouses and dependents outside of the company’s firewalls can access this information. Clients get analytics and other information about how employees consume the information.

Video and audio shows its value in employee communications because it gets straight to the point. This content helps you communicate clear, concise, and valuable information to your employees. Employees can re-watch digital presentations, like Brainshark, which eliminate confusion over core information.

Video and audio is a great add to your marketing/communications mix. It’s a necessary tool that can help your company engage and inform employees, while being mindful of the bottom line.

 

 

Paige McQuillen

Written by Paige McQuillen

Paige McQuillen is a summer marketing intern for Trion. She is a rising Junior at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, where she majors in Marketing. Paige enjoys using her creativity in her writing and has previous experience with blogging.

Trion Communications paige.mcquillen@trion-mma.com