How to Create Communications for Gen Z Employees

How to Create Communications for Gen Z Employees

The workforce is changing. Generation Z, those born 1996 and later, have begun to graduate college and enter the job market. If you haven’t already felt the influence of this generation at your company, you will soon.

It can be tricky to communicate across the now four generations that make up your employee base. Remember different groups have their own preferences to receive and process information. You’re probably most unfamiliar with the youngest cohort. Are you ready to create communications for Gen Z employees?

The Value of Face-to-Face Communications

First, some rather unexpected news. Even with their constant immersion in technology, Generation Z employees value in-person communications. Thirty-nine percent rated that method as the most effective way to reach them. In another survey, this generation ranked their at-work communication preferences as

  1. Face-to Face
  2. Text
  3. Email
  4. Phone.

Short, regular, one-on-one check-ins are vital to these employees. They want regular feedback from their managers. Yet, to be ready to communicate with Gen Z, you must be ready for two-way conversations. Fifty-one percent said leaders who listen to them help them do their best work.

They value face-to-face communications, but Gen Z has a shorter attention span than previous generations. It’s no wonder that the greatest share of Snapchat users are between ages 18-24. Bite-sized chunks of information are the way to reach this group. Meetings should be brief and more importantly, interactive, to hold the interest of these employees. Instead of a weekly, hour-long sit-down, try a daily ten-minute standing huddle. If your meetings are leaders talking at workers, you will lose their attention.

Smartphones All Day

Yes, Gen Z thrives on in-person conversations more than their Millennial predecessors. But, there is another way their communications preferences differ. These employees grew up as digital natives. They expect fast, effective technology. Each day, a member of Gen Z multi-tasks across five screens. Will your communications grab their attention on at least one of those devices? To create communications for Gen Z employees, you must develop a strong mobile strategy.

Smartphones are the device of choice for these employees. Previous generations may have viewed texts from the company as intrusive. Gen Z ranked them ahead of email as their preferred way to receive corporate information. Invest in a platform that lets you send texts to a large number of recipients. Ask yourself, what real-time information can we share via text? Gen Z estimates they only need five to ten minutes a day to understand relevant information from their company. Texts are a great medium to provide that instant knowledge.

This generation also values apps for employee communications. They don’t want to log onto an employee intranet, they want one-touch access on their phones. Managers can approve vacation requests, provide performance feedback, and share information on benefits through an app. Gen Z relies on technology. How can you use it to create communications for them and make sure key messages are heard?

Video Bridges the Gap

In the spirit of technology, it comes as no surprise that Gen Z thrives on video. Consider that YouTube is their most-used app. You don’t have to create the next viral sensation. You should use video to provide the real-time information this generation craves. Why not try video meetings instead of in-office meetings? It will keep remote workers engaged with the team.

Short videos are also a great way to educate Gen Z on benefits and other company policies. This cohort ranks videos as their preferred learning method. Apply that technology to onboard new hires, introduce new benefits and conduct other HR functions. But, remember to keep it snappy. The WIFFM or What’s in it for me of communications to should be brief and bold. Give them the essence of what they need, then let them be on their way.

Remember to be Inclusive

Keep in mind that effective workplace communications consider the needs of all employees. These suggestions to create communications for Gen Z employees should not be taken at the expense of other generations’ preferences. Well-rounded communications efforts insure the entire workforce receives and process information. Think of these as additional tools for your toolbox. With planning, your company can be ready to communicate across generations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danielle Love

Written by Danielle Love

Danielle is a benefits communications specialist, working on behalf of clients to write, edit and design dynamic print and virtual communications. She also manages the Trion Communications blog, which highlights the practice’s diverse areas of expertise.

Trion Communications Danielle.Love@trion-mma.com

Are Your Employees Nervous about ACA Repeal?

Are Your Employees Nervous about ACA Repeal?

A keystone of President Trump’s campaign was getting rid of the Affordable Care Act. Even before he took office last week, speculation about what might happen to the law was ubiquitous in the media.

For most employers, it’s probably too early to address the ACA within your organization. But if ACA gossip is spreading among your employees, you might want to consider some proactive communications. After all, nothing dispels water-cooler rumors as effectively as clear and honest information.

You might be thinking, “What is there to say? We are still trying to understand the current landscape and have not made any plans to change anything so far.”

Well, that’s exactly what you want to tell your employees. Here are a few tips to create an effective communication:

Start with a clear statement about what’s happening. You know there has been a lot of talk in the media, and you know the President signed an executive order on January 20 to “waive, defer, grant exemptions from, or delay the implementation” of any provision of the law (see the latest Trion HCR Alert for more on the executive order). However, Congress has not yet acted to repeal the law, and there’s no clear replacement on the table.

Next, tell employees where the company is. Say what you are doing – are you’re sitting tight and waiting for Congress to act? Are you working with your broker, legal counsel, etc., to understand the implications?

Say what you’re not doing, too, especially if you’re hearing specific rumors (e.g., “We’re not going to have benefits through the company anymore.”). If you are not currently planning to make any changes to your benefits strategy as a result of what’s happening now, state that clearly.

Be careful, however, that you don’t create misconceptions. For example, just because you’re not planning to change anything right now, doesn’t mean you won’t in the future. In fact, depending on what happens with the ACA, you may have to. And you will still do your due diligence at renewal time and may make some changes, like you always do – as of right now, the ACA’s fate won’t change that.

At the end of the day, employees want to know whether the rug will be pulled out from under them. Employer-provided benefits pre-date the ACA by decades, so pretty much all of your current workforce has known that world, even if they haven’t always worked in a job that offered employer benefits.

To assuage concerns, re-state your commitment to the health and well-being of your employees, to be executed in a way that is sustainable for the company and compliant with all applicable regulations. That’s what you do now, what you’ve been doing for years (long before the ACA), and that’s not changing.

Written by Jill Diffendal

Trion Communications jill.diffendal@trion-mma.com

Thank You and Happy Holidays!

Thank You and Happy Holidays!

Gratitude: That’s what I’m feeling right now. We come to the office every single day in the hopes of working with great people, doing meaningful work, and making a difference. And I’m delighted to say, in 2016, we did it! Thanks, in great part, to all of you.

Which is why, as we bring this year’s Open Enrollment and holiday season to its festive close, I want to give a big THANK YOU to those who’ve touched our practice, helping us do what we do. Thank you for entrusting us with your business, your time, your challenges, your opinions, your faith, your support, your ideas, and your collaborative genius. Thanks for sharing with us all the things that make you uniquely YOU. We look forward to doing it all over again next year!

Until then, have a very happy holiday season. Enjoy. Sleep in. Eat a lot. Give presents. Read a book. Hug your friends, shop the sales, and get your fill of holiday movies. Do your thing. And we’ll see you in 2017!!!

Jill Sherer Murray

Written by Jill Sherer Murray

As practice leader, Jill has built an award-winning communications practice inside a global consulting firm, and continues to grow the business and the team. She oversees the strategic vision and day-to-day activities in developing employee benefits education and engagement strategies.

Trion Communications jill.murray@trion-mma.com

“Consumerism” is Really Just the Power of Choice

“Consumerism” is Really Just the Power of Choice

Consumerism. I’m not a fan of the word. I’m also not a fan of being deemed a “good consumer.” It’s odd praise to me. However, I am a fan of making good decisions—which to me means those that affect me or those I love in a positive way. So when I think about this buzzword “consumerism,” I really just think about it as the power given when presented with a choice.

As a mother of two small children, it’s a careful balancing act for me to help my kids be independent while guiding them toward good decisions, and telling them what to do while creating opportunities for them to decide for themselves. Honestly, it can be exhausting – after all, choices are all around us, every day. Do you want milk or water? Are you going to wear your jacket or not? Do you want the applesauce or slices of apple today?

Yet guiding my children to make their own choices is important, so I do everything I can to set them up to be successful. I think about the information I need to share and, most importantly, how I need to share it so that they receive it in a way that will enable them to make good decisions.

If, for example, I give the choice of wearing a jacket, I need to present the right information – what the weather is like, whether they will play outside in the afternoon, whether I think will they be too cold without one if they decide to leave it home (or should they play it safe and put it in their school bags).

I also think about how to share the information they need. If, for example, I tell them about the weather when they’re just waking up, or as I’m helping them get dressed, it’s too hard for them to process.

The same is true for our clients and their employees. Most people need time to consider what information has been shared, and then think about their options so they can make their choice and accept the outcome. It’s not enough to just toss benefits information at employees. Rather, employers need to paint the picture with the right context.

This morning, it was cool – not cold, but cool. So I told my son, “It’s a little cool and it’s raining, so you’ll need your umbrella, but you won’t have recess outside. It’s up to you if you want your jacket.” He emerged from his room wearing a long-sleeved shirt, fleece pants, socks and shoes, and got his umbrella from the spot where we keep them beside the door. I gave him the “are we all set?” look and he smiled and said, “No jacket, I’m not cold.”

Just to be certain, I opened the front door and said, “Want to double check?” He peeked his head out, decided he was all set, and off we went to school.

Whenever we present someone with a choice, context is critical. With enough information, making a good choice (remember my definition of “good” being relative to affecting the person in a positive way) becomes easier, and we’re more likely to accept the outcome of our decision.

Without enough information or the right context, well, let’s imagine what would happen if I hadn’t told my son it was cool and raining, and he just assumed that since it was light out, it was warm: a sad, wet, 5-year-old who blames his mommy for sending him out unprotected.

Instead, I gave him the pertinent details, in a way he could absorb the information. I let him choose, and then gave him a chance to confirm his decision. He got the power to choose, and made a choice that felt positive to him: he didn’t have to carry his jacket, he stayed dry, and got to show off his cartoon character-branded umbrella. A true kindergarten win!

So, the next time you have the ability to create choice for someone, ask yourself: Did you share enough information, in the right context? Or will someone blame you for sending them out uninformed?

Lauren Perry

Written by Lauren Perry

Trion Communications lauren.perry@trion-mma.com

Six Ways to Live in the After

Six Ways to Live in the After

The past several months have had me operating in triple time. There has been:

  1. preparations for my big debut on the TEDxWilmington Women stage,
  2. arthroscopic knee surgery the day after, and
  3. leading my team through the busy Open Enrollment season.

It’s probably no surprise that, with all three in the hopper, I’m feeling a bit down this week, which is why I’m taking the time to indulge myself in writing this blog – to help you and me, truthfully, find our way through it.

Here’s a six-step plan I’ve come up with as an antidote for living in the “after” – the gray space that happens when [that big thing] is over. Perhaps it can help you too!

  1. Just enjoy. Take a moment to smell the roses and bask in the afterglow of your achievements. I should be embarrassed to tell you how many times a day (15 to 30) I relive the standing ovation I got after I finished my TEDx talk, but the endorphin release has got to be good for my body. I worked hard for that moment and I’m proud of it. So, I’m going to milk it for all it’s worth until everybody is super sick of hearing about it (probably happened already) – including me (not there yet)!
  1. Reconnect to your peaceful and, if appropriate, spiritual self. The day after my talk and surgery, I spent a lot of time on the sofa binge-watching Doctor Foster on Netflix, reading People magazine (my version of pop rocks candy), and just breathing. While it helped that I couldn’t move around too much without crutches, I still would’ve taken the time to sit, think, process, and breathe.
  1. Imagine big. Ahhh, here’s the fun part. What comes next? I’ve just done my first TEDx talk. My knee is finally on the mend. I’m no longer worried about finding a team member on the window ledge during Open Enrollment. It’s time to paint a picture of what’s on deck next. I say challenge yourself and go for it! (Tedx talk number two? Maybe a book? Or a fun run?)
  1. Manifest. People, I’m here to tell you this works! I spent an entire year picturing myself in the red circle on the TEDx stage while listening to my theme song (yes, go ahead and laugh). And viola, I applied and they accepted. Just give it a try. What we give attention, we give power. So manifest away: your employees managing their health care spending like financial whiz kids, being fluent in the language of benefits, and thanking you for such a great benefits package and clear communications.
  1. Let go of anything that may be standing in your way. Letting go is, in fact, the subject of my talk. (I’ll share when it’s available!) That means problem-solving around whatever external obstacles may be in your way. And, doing the internal work necessary to have the life you want.
  1. Make it happen when you’re ready. That does not mean waiting for all conditions to be perfect. Rather, it means that when you’re equal parts exhilarated and terrified by the thought of doing something, you’re there. And if you need the kind of help the Trion Communications team offers, we are too!
Jill Sherer Murray

Written by Jill Sherer Murray

As practice leader, Jill has built an award-winning communications practice inside a global consulting firm, and continues to grow the business and the team. She oversees the strategic vision and day-to-day activities in developing employee benefits education and engagement strategies.

Trion Communications jill.murray@trion-mma.com

What Motivates You? Tips to Stay Focused during Open Enrollment

What Motivates You? Tips to Stay Focused during Open Enrollment

As an organizational leader, how do you keep yourself engaged in your day-to-day tasks? Do you find that you sometimes want to mix things up a little and bring something new to your daily work process?

People depend on you for your skills and knowledge you have of your job and the company, so keeping yourself motivated is very important. With the busy months of open enrollment, it’s easy to get burned out and even lose focus. If we’re not motivated everyday by something, we may fall off track. Here are some tips to help you stay motivated, gain focus and keep you engaged in the daily demands of a busy work environment.

Remind yourself that it’s worthwhile. Recognize that you are helping your employees, peers or staff, by educating them on their benefits and helping them choose the right coverage for their families. Health insurance can be a tedious subject, but the knowledge that you bring can be both enlightening and invigorating.

Keep yourself and your employees informed. Not only do you want to keep your employees motivated about enrolling in their benefits, but you also want to make sure you are well informed about what your company offers. Learning more about your company and discovering hidden perks and programs that may be offered will keep you in the know – and to know is to believe.

Practice what you preach. When communicating good health and wellness behaviors to your employees, make sure you are taking your own advice. Stay motivated by choosing more healthy snacks during the day and making time to fit in an exercise or two. Take a walk with a colleague, or just stretch at your desk a few times a day. If you’re encouraging your employees to set goals to live a healthier lifestyle, show them that it’s not all talk.

Amy Boulden

Written by Amy Boulden

Amy works as a benefits communications specialist. Her creative background in graphic design has allowed her to create a library of client communications. Amy’s approach is to focus on simple, clear language and relatable graphics to effectively educate employees.

Trion Communications amy.boulden@trion-mma.com