How to Communicate Better with your Graphic Designer

How to Communicate Better with your Graphic Designer

Over the years, I have noticed the following procedures correlate with efficient design projects.

Tell us your problems, goals and expectations

A big part of the design process is figuring out how to solve your problems and meet your goals and expectations with an exciting design. Before designers begin working with colors and images we put a lot of thought into how we can communicate your information in a logical way. Design can help solve your communication problems and meet your goals and expectations. One problem could be how to communicate a complicated open enrollment benefit chart in an easy-to-understand way. Another issue is how to make sure your target audience receives important information. If we know what you need to accomplish, we can figure out the best way to get the results you want.

Give us your guidelines, stylesheets and deadlines

The more information you give us the better. If you are not sure what you want (besides visually-appealing content) even the smallest detail or note is helpful. But, remember, the less information we have the greater the chance the proof will not be what you expected, and it may require extensive revisions. The deadline is also important. Most designers I know will change things and think of new ideas and modifications until the end of time, so we need a deadline. A deadline helps us fit all creativity, design execution, and proofing into the time available to us.

Tell us what you don’t you want

Telling us what you don’t want is also helpful. It helps us narrow down what we have to work with and also makes you happy since your proof won’t contain your pet peeves. If you do not like purple, Helvetica, and cartoony art let us know upfront.

Give us examples

If you have an example of what how envision your project, show it to us. We won’t copy the examples but will use them to get an idea of what you want for the project’s overall look. Maybe you envision it clean with a lot of white space, or fun, or corporate. Since all these styles are subjective an example helps us determine your idea of “fun.”

Tell us what you like and dislike about the proof

We took all information you gave us and figured out a way to visually represent it. The proof is now in your inbox. The first draft should be close to what you were expecting relative to the amount of information you gave us. If the proof is not what you were expecting there is a positive consequence. We now have an example of what you don’t want. The best thing we can do is apply the above steps to the proof. Tell us what you don’t like about the proof, give us examples of what you do like, and give us guidelines on what to change.

Working with your graphic designer and achieving great results will be easy if you follow the above recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Mike Turko

Mike is a senior graphic designer at Trion. He specializes in communicating ideas through both print and digital design mediums. Mike also works to develop custom, interactive digital marketing campaigns that effectively engage a variety of employee audiences.

Trion Communications mike.turko@trion-mma.com