What Your Younger Employees Need to Know About Life Insurance Policies

What Your Younger Employees Need to Know About Life Insurance Policies

Most of your younger employees don’t think that a life insurance policy applies to them. For the most part, they’re still healthy. For another, many haven’t yet married or had children, and see an investment in life insurance as a waste of money.

And yet, the truth is life insurance can be meaningful for everybody, no matter their age or stage of life. The challenge is to help them see how they can benefit from a life insurance policy when they’re not convinced they need it just yet.

That’s where effective communications come in. Use the right strategy and tactics to encourage younger employees to take a look at life insurance. Help them see its value and embrace that idea that it may not be as expensive or unnecessary as they think. To the contrary, buying a plan now may very well save them money down the road. Here are four tactics to get your younger employees to consider a life insurance policy.

1. Remind Them Insurance Protects Their Loved Ones In Case Of The Unexpected

While nobody ever wants an accident or injury to happen, the fact is it does at any age. That’s why your younger workers should consider a life insurance policy. It protects their family members from having to worry about paying for a costly funeral. If employees are aware of this huge expense it could sway them to buy a plan. Then they wouldn’t feel guilty about leaving those expenses up to someone else.

2. Convey That Plans Are Affordable

Let them know that you, as their employer, already offer them a basic life insurance policy. Show them the value of buying supplemental life insurance on top of it.

If your company doesn’t already offer it, think about adding supplemental life insurance to your voluntary benefits. Your employees will appreciate the convenience of one-stop shopping for benefits. Supplemental life insurance normally only costs healthy people in their twenties a couple pennies to the dollar per month. It is worth the investment to buy supplemental coverage, as it will not put a dent in their pockets.

3. Promote Now, Save Later

One of the easiest incentives for your younger employees to consider life insurance policies now is that they’re less expensive. Although they may not feel they need life insurance right now, they know they will need it later in their lives. This is a great selling point. Use side-by-side comparison charts and coverage examples in your communications to show them the value of buying when they’re young.

4. Show Them the Stakes

Most younger employees don’t consider the stakes involved in not having life insurance coverage. The risk of disease and death is lower for the young and healthy, but the unexpected can happen. And if it did, how would their loved ones fare? Employees need to understand life insurance offers them and their families’ important protection. Their families won’t go into debt paying for their care or funeral expenses.

Younger employees should consider other expenses too. If a parent co-signed on a private student loan, they would be responsible for the balance. That can be a hefty sum.

Employers should communicate to younger employees that life insurance is indeed for everyone. Help them see the wisdom of buying a life insurance policy at an earlier age. It is an important way for employers to help their people stay healthy—physically, mentally, and financially.

 

Written by Paige McQuillen

Paige McQuillen is a summer marketing intern for Trion. She is a rising Junior at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, where she majors in Marketing. Paige enjoys using her creativity in her writing and has previous experience with blogging.

Trion Communications paige.mcquillen@trion-mma.com

Why Do I Need Identity Theft Protection Benefits?

Why Do I Need Identity Theft Protection Benefits?

We hear stories every day about the perils of identity theft. It can not only impact a person’s credit, but in some cases, their entire lives.

ID theft is not an isolated incident. In fact, identity theft was the number one complaint consumers made to the Federal Trade Commission for 15 consecutive years.

Do you offer your employees a robust identity theft protection plan as part of their benefits package? About 36% of companies offer some form of ID theft protection services as an employee benefit. This voluntary benefit is a great way to distinguish you as an employer who cares. Employees have a sense of security when they know they have a plan to protect their finances and future.

If enrollment in this benefit is not as robust as it could be, maybe it’s time to beef up your communications.

Promote the Need for Identity Theft Protection

Your employees may have questions about identity theft protection services. What exactly is ID theft? How is it different from credit card fraud? Why do I need ID theft protection? Communications should seek to solve these concerns.

Lay out the stakes. Credit card fraud is a quick and deliberate attack that’s solved with a phone call to the credit card company. Identify theft is more complicated since it’s designed to duplicate a person’s identity. The thief’s goal is to take as much as they can until they are caught. If employees are not protected by a solid ID theft plan, they could potentially lose everything

In today’s world, most hackers launch network attacks where they attempt to crack weak passwords. Add to the benefit and point employees in the direction of training to learn about safe data management practices. These include the use of strong passwords and the avoidance of suspicious email links and websites.

Communicate About ID Theft Protection During Open Enrollment

During open enrollment, your employees feel overwhelmed as they try to navigate through all the options.  After learning about their other benefits, they might not have the bandwidth to process more information. Identity theft protection is usually an employee-paid benefit. So, use your communications to emphasize its worth.

Make it easy with targeted pieces of information about ID theft protection services. Lay out what the benefit entails and why it makes sense. Recovering from identity theft is a stressful process that takes time and money. A protection plan assists with some of the associated costs. These can include phone bills and postage, notary fees, costs of obtaining credit reports, and maybe legal fees. Of course, each carrier’s benefits will differ.

Carriers will have resources you can mine for data, so why make more work for yourself? Use those materials for source information and to answer common questions. Attach downloadable fact sheets to videos, place flyers in gathering spaces like lunchrooms and copy rooms and ask managers to distribute materials in meetings.

Engage with Real-Life Stories About the Value of ID Theft Protection

Engage employees with real-life scenarios that show the benefit in action. Stories add credibility behind the value of the ID theft protection benefit and create connections. Employees love to read about their co-workers and how the company’s benefits make a difference in their lives. Use stories throughout your various communications— newsletters, videos, even posters with pictures.

Helping employees stay safe and secure and protect their personal information is a great service. Thorough communications help employees appreciate the value of this benefit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Trion Interns

Trion Communications jill.diffendal@gmail.com

Communicating the Value of Voluntary Benefits with Employees

Communicating the Value of Voluntary Benefits with Employees

In annual open enrollment communications, many organizations must explain why employee contributions have risen and coverage has changed. In our work with our clients, we see firsthand the tensions of benefits professionals. They try to offer the highest quality benefits while preventing higher costs from passing on to employees. This challenge of getting value for the money is echoed in many areas of employees’ lives outside the workplace. There is a widening gap between income and expenses that everyone is trying to address.

Fortunately, companies and employees alike are embracing Voluntary Benefits in greater numbers. Voluntary Benefits allow employers to offer a more robust benefits package to their employees. In effect, they help them “mind the gap.” They give employees the positive feeling of customization. Employees pick and choose the specific benefits that meet their needs. Coverage options range from life insurance to pet insurance to dental and vision plans; identity theft protection; even legal services and financial counseling. Voluntary Benefits are employee-paid but employees conveniently pay premiums through payroll deduction.

If your organization offers Voluntary Benefits, you should put extra effort into communicating their value to employees. You can raise awareness and increase participation in these valuable parts of your benefits offerings.

Help Employees Mind the Gap

If your employees don’t closely track their household finances, they might not understand certain life events could impact their budget.  It’s important to emphasize the overall increase in the costs of services for everything from an x-ray to an hour of legal counsel. When presented with the total, employees may see a need for additional protection.

Explain How Each Benefit Works

Take a look at the average company’s benefits communications and you’ll see its medical plan(s) front and center. Once employees wade through information on deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums, fatigue might set in when they reach the Voluntary Benefits section. It’s important to connect Voluntary Benefits, like critical illness or accident coverage, to your company’s medical plans. The location of such messages in your benefits booklets can remove some of the effort to create the connection for employees.

You should also consider creating additional, separate communications emphasize your Voluntary Benefits offerings. This will give you the opportunity to explain how each benefit works in more detail. This is a great opportunity to reinforce how each Voluntary Benefit fits into your company’s overall benefits philosophy. You want to use positive associations to help employees view Voluntary Benefits as possible solutions to the income/expense gap.

Provide Examples

One of the strengths of Voluntary Benefits is that they provide great value when compared to the cost that comes out of an employee’s paycheck. Give employees scenarios in which the benefits could potentially help cushion the impact caused by a life event. Call attention to the coverage amounts so that employees understand what would be available in each situation. If you are able to paint a clear picture, you increase the chances the scales will tip in favor of employees enrolling in the benefit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Andrew Clancy

Andrew is an experienced communications professional who specializes in multimedia content creation. He enjoys the process of building communications solutions that achieve an organization’s objectives while empowering its employees through education.

Trion Communications Andrew.Clancy@trion-mma.com